How to Succeed with Binary Options Trading at Home 2020

2019 Hyperpop Rate (Slayyyter / 100 gecs / Dorian Electra / Hannah Diamond)

Hello ladies, gays, enbys, and other pots-and-pans enthusiasts and welcome to the 2019 Hyperpop Rate! I'm your host, quenched, and am here to guide you through this month's rate full of boundary-pushing, experimental, over-the-top bubblegum bass, or as it is more commonly called, hyperpop. The genre has come a long way since it's humble PC Music beginnings and has grown to boast a large cult fanbase, majority of which is made of members of the LGBTQ+ community.
Here are the cling clang bitches we will be rating:
In case you're impatient like me and already know the drill...
HERE is the link to the Spotify playlist
HERE is the link to submit scores

Slayyyter - Slayyyter

Up first, we have Slayyyter, queen of high-budget-sounding-but-actually-low-budget Grindrcore music, with her self-titled debut mixtape. After releasing a string of singles starting in 2018 with BFF, featuring hyperpop legend Ayesha Erotica, she has held the attention of gays and hyperpop fans everywhere, propelled by her dominating stan-like presence on social media. While not every loose single made the cut for her mixtape, she still has a versatile discography with zero misses, whether making filthy, horny bangers on songs like "Candy" and "Daddy AF", braggadocious bops "Cha Ching" and "Celebrity", or glittery bubblegum pop such as fan-favorite "Mine". Warning: you will become slightly gayer upon album completion.

Tracklist:

  1. BFF (feat. Ayesha Erotica)
  2. Mine
  3. Alone
  4. Candy
  5. Cha Ching
  6. Devil
  7. Ur Man
  8. Daddy AF
  9. Motorcycle
  10. Celebrity
  11. Tattoo
  12. E-Boy (feat. That Kid)
  13. Touch My Body
  14. Ghosttt

100 gecs - 1000 gecs

This rate marks the first time in Popheads rate history we have cut an album from a rate and replaced it with another. LIZ's album "Planet Y2K" was supposed to be in the rate initially, but it came to my attention that she is a transphobic Trump supporter with NO apology or backtrack ever given. So, I posted this comment one day in a Daily Discussion post, and after 72 votes, 65% of you wanted LIZ to be replaced with 100 gecs (which honestly is better anyways musically speaking).
100 gecs are definitely one of the more well known hyperpop acts. The critically acclaimed duo are one of the few hyperpop acts to reach well beyond the LGBTQ+ audience. Consisting of Dylan Brady and Laura Les (who is trans!!!), the duo's debut album, especially money machine, has gone semi-viral within the music sphere and TikTok alike. If you can say one thing about this album, it's that you never know what to expect or what crazy sounds you're going to hear next! They also released a phenomenal remix album called "1000 gecs and The Tree of Clues", reimagining every song on this album and featuring many Popheads favorites such as Charli XCX and Kero Kero Bonito.
gecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgecgec

Tracklist:

  1. 745 sticky
  2. money machine
  3. 800 db cloud
  4. I Need Help Immediately
  5. stupid horse
  6. xXXi_wud_nvrstøp_ÜXXx
  7. ringtone
  8. gecgecgec
  9. hand crushed by a mallet
  10. gec 2 Ü

Dorian Electra - Flamboyant

Challenging heteronormativity and the gender binary, Dorian exploded onto the scene with many loose singles, beginning with Clitopia in 2016. These singles led up to Flamboyant, an abrasive, electropop album that doesn't have a single skip! The album also features some production by Dylan Brady, who is one-half of 100 gecs, also present in this rate. Beyond the songs themselves all being bangers, lyrically Dorian explores different aspects of their sexuality and masculinity in songs such as "Emasculate", "Flamboyant", and Adam & Steve, a song which is sure to resonate which any religious gays participating in the rate. Dorian has already released their second album "My Agenda", which I also definitely recommend everyone streams after doing the rate!
Note: Dorian uses they/them pronouns so I'm gonna be mad if I get any ballots using anything otherwise!

Tracklist:

  1. Mr. To You
  2. Career Boy
  3. Daddy Like
  4. Emasculate
  5. Man To Man
  6. Musical Genius
  7. Flamboyant
  8. Guyliner
  9. Live By The Sword
  10. Adam & Steve
  11. fReAkY 4 Life
  12. Tool For You
  13. Under The Armor
  14. Guyliner, Pt. 2
  15. Your Kinda Guy

Hannah Diamond - Reflections

Lastly we have Hannah Diamond, who has been around the longest of the artists in this rate, releasing her first song in 2013. She was one of the first names in PC Music, taking her until 2019 to release her debut album (giving Sky Ferreira a run for her money as far as album waits go). Featuring A.G. Cook production and dreamy vocals from Hannah, this album was definitely worth the long wait!

Tracklist:

  1. Reflections
  2. Invisible
  3. Love Goes On
  4. Never Again
  5. True
  6. Concrete Angel
  7. The Ending
  8. Shy
  9. Fade Away
  10. Make Believe

BONUS RATE

Unfortunately for this rate, we couldn't include the queen of hyperpop, Emily Montes, as she did not debut until 2020, therefore not fitting the rate theme. At only 5 years old, she is already receiving fairly decent critical reception. She has two projects on Spotify, the self-titled debut album, Emily Montes and the also self-titled EP, Emily. Featuring experimental production, lyrics that touch on serious topics such as COVID-19 and BLM, and never-before-seen insight into a 5 year old's life, both projects are masterpieces. Despite the seemingly large amount of songs, the bonus rate only lasts 7 minutes and 47 seconds so I definitely recommend setting aside this short amount of time to participate and experience a true visionary.
This part is completely optional and is just for fun. You may rate as many or as few songs as you'd like. No 0's or 11's, and and no minimum artist average. Here are the songs for the bonus rate:

Emily Montes:

  1. EmiLy
  2. Emily montes
  3. Emily rose
  4. Emily montes (Breakup)
  5. Emily montes (Corona Is Crazy)
  6. Frozen
  7. Untitled
  8. Emily From The West
  9. Untitled 2
  10. If you know you know if you don't you don't
  11. Take me away
  12. Roblox is my life
  13. Give me my crown
  14. Roboticy

Emily:

  1. Brand New - Intro
  2. Haters / BLM George Floyd / Dark
  3. Hungry / I Like to Go Outside

The Rules

  • Listen to EVERY SINGLE SONG in the main rate! Any ballots missing scores will not be accepted.
  • Scores should be between 1-10, with only one decimal place if desired. Anymore will crash the program!! (i.e. 5.5 is accepted, 5.55 is not)
  • You may give ONE song an 11, and ONE song a 0. Reserve these scores for your favorite and least favorite songs in the rate, respectively.
  • Submit scores via the prepared link at the bottom of this post.
  • If you let some of the songs marinate and end up wanting to change up your scores throughout the rate period, feel free to PM me at any time!
  • Scores will probably be due sometime early to mid-December, but try and have them in by the end of the month if you can!
  • Sabotage is NOT allowed, so leave the stan twitter mindset at the door! I reserve the right to question any seemingly over-the-top low or high averages.
  • Here is the only format accepted for scores and comments (you may also leave comments for the albums as a whole if you'd like):
Mine: 1 oh me oh my this song is shit
Album: 1000 gecs: the lil piss babies did THAT
Any other format for scores/comments is incorrect!

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST

SUBMISSION LINK

(Just in case the preprepared link doesn't work, here is a pastebin of the submission format. Just copy and paste it to me via DM with your scores and comments)
Happy rating!
submitted by DaHumanTorch to popheads [link] [comments]

Among Us Shenanigans

I know that the game is blowing up on the channel and content might be getting a little dry so here is some stuff I discovered about the game that can spice things up.
So I was poking around at the config files for the game and found the field for the max player count. Located in the AppData/LocalLow/Innersloth/Among Us folder, you'll find a file called "gameHostOptions". This is a binary file that has all the options for a game. If you open up the file in a hex editor you'll find that the second byte is '0A' which is 10 in decimal (aka the max player count). Use in the hex editor you can change the value to be between 0-255. Now the problem is that the master server checks the host options and will refuse a game where the player count isn't ten. However, you can just host a local and then use this handy dandy tool https://github.com/monster860/among-us-tunnel. With just a little bit of port forwarding, you'll be able to host a game with any rule breaking options you want.
As a bonus, in that same file path you'll find the 'playerPrefs' file which is in plain text. It's comma separated and the first value is your in game name. Now you can use non-alphabetic characters and break the character limit. Additionally, it will take in line break (no escape characters through) but the master server will deny you access if it sees line breaks. That is not the case if you host a local game (just like above).
submitted by notareddituser20 to MrFruit [link] [comments]

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222, the product of our May/June development cycle, is ready today, and it’s a very exciting release. There are lots of bug fixes, including some long-standing issues with classics like Bosconian and Gaplus, and missing pan/zoom effects in games on Seta hardware. Two more Nintendo LCD games are supported: the Panorama Screen version of Popeye, and the two-player Donkey Kong 3 Micro Vs. System. New versions of supported games include a review copy of DonPachi that allows the game to be paused for photography, and a version of the adult Qix game Gals Panic for the Taiwanese market.
Other advancements on the arcade side include audio circuitry emulation for 280-ZZZAP, and protection microcontroller emulation for Kick and Run and Captain Silver.
The GRiD Compass series were possibly the first rugged computers in the clamshell form factor, possibly best known for their use on NASA space shuttle missions in the 1980s. The initial model, the Compass 1101, is now usable in MAME. There are lots of improvements to the Tandy Color Computer drivers in this release, with better cartridge support being a theme. Acorn BBC series drivers now support Solidisk file system ROMs. Writing to IMD floppy images (popular for CP/M computers) is now supported, and a critical bug affecting writes to HFE disk images has been fixed. Software list additions include a collection of CDs for the SGI MIPS workstations.
There are several updates to Apple II emulation this month, including support for several accelerators, a new IWM floppy controller core, and support for using two memory cards simultaneously on the CFFA2. As usual, we’ve added the latest original software dumps and clean cracks to the software lists, including lots of educational titles.
Finally, the memory system has been optimised, yielding performance improvements in all emulated systems, you no longer need to avoid non-ASCII characters in paths when using the chdman tool, and jedutil supports more devices.
There were too many HyperScan RFID cards added to the software list to itemise them all here. You can read about all the updates in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAME Testers Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

Clones promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

submitted by cuavas to emulation [link] [comments]

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222, the product of our May/June development cycle, is ready today, and it’s a very exciting release. There are lots of bug fixes, including some long-standing issues with classics like Bosconian and Gaplus, and missing pan/zoom effects in games on Seta hardware. Two more Nintendo LCD games are supported: the Panorama Screen version of Popeye, and the two-player Donkey Kong 3 Micro Vs. System. New versions of supported games include a review copy of DonPachi that allows the game to be paused for photography, and a version of the adult Qix game Gals Panic for the Taiwanese market.
Other advancements on the arcade side include audio circuitry emulation for 280-ZZZAP, and protection microcontroller emulation for Kick and Run and Captain Silver.
The GRiD Compass series were possibly the first rugged computers in the clamshell form factor, possibly best known for their use on NASA space shuttle missions in the 1980s. The initial model, the Compass 1101, is now usable in MAME. There are lots of improvements to the Tandy Color Computer drivers in this release, with better cartridge support being a theme. Acorn BBC series drivers now support Solidisk file system ROMs. Writing to IMD floppy images (popular for CP/M computers) is now supported, and a critical bug affecting writes to HFE disk images has been fixed. Software list additions include a collection of CDs for the SGI MIPS workstations.
There are several updates to Apple II emulation this month, including support for several accelerators, a new IWM floppy controller core, and support for using two memory cards simultaneously on the CFFA2. As usual, we’ve added the latest original software dumps and clean cracks to the software lists, including lots of educational titles.
Finally, the memory system has been optimised, yielding performance improvements in all emulated systems, you no longer need to avoid non-ASCII characters in paths when using the chdman tool, and jedutil supports more devices.
There were too many HyperScan RFID cards added to the software list to itemise them all here. You can read about all the updates in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAME Testers Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

Clones promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

submitted by cuavas to MAME [link] [comments]

Docker swarm stack: Traefik with Whoami returns `404 page not found`

I've tried to use the basic example guide in Traefik docs web, but always get error when check the WhoAmi service:
I should see the output of the whoami service (curl -H Host:whoami.volkonik.xyz http://whoami.volkonik.xyz). Something similar to:

Hostname: d7f919e54651 IP: 127.0.0.1 IP: 192.168.64.2 GET / HTTP/1.1 Host: whoami.localhost User-Agent: curl/7.52.1 Accept: */* Accept-Encoding: gzip X-Forwarded-For: 192.168.64.1 X-Forwarded-Host: whoami.localhost X-Forwarded-Port: 80 X-Forwarded-Proto: http X-Forwarded-Server: 7f0c797dbc51 X-Real-Ip: 192.168.64.1 
But I get:
404 page not found 
Regarding to my task I should use docker swarm with 3 managers use "docker stack" commands, not docker compose and deploy traefik with exposed whoami service.
Command that I use to deploy my stack: deploy -c overflow.yml overflow. My overflow.yml:
version: "3.3" services: traefik: image: "traefik:v2.2" command: #- "--log.level=DEBUG" - "--api.insecure=true" - "--providers.docker=true" - "--providers.docker.swarmMode=true" - "--providers.docker.exposedbydefault=false" - "--entrypoints.web.address=:80" ports: - "80:80" - "8080:8080" volumes: - "/varun/docker.sock:/varun/docker.sock:ro" whoami: image: "containous/whoami" labels: - "traefik.enable=true" - "traefik.http.routers.whoami.rule=Host(`whoami.volkonik.xyz`)" - "traefik.http.routers.whoami.entrypoints=web" 
Docker info:
Client: Debug Mode: false Server: Containers: 2 Running: 1 Paused: 0 Stopped: 1 Images: 5 Server Version: 19.03.12 Storage Driver: overlay2 Backing Filesystem: extfs Supports d_type: true Native Overlay Diff: true Logging Driver: json-file Cgroup Driver: cgroupfs Plugins: Volume: local Network: bridge host ipvlan macvlan null overlay Log: awslogs fluentd gcplogs gelf journald json-file local logentries splunk syslog Swarm: active NodeID: 5l5fmyv287ro7x07h5rhrzim5 Is Manager: true ClusterID: zoiwzedomj7lbyvqh69rn9m64 Managers: 3 Nodes: 3 Default Address Pool: 10.0.0.0/8 SubnetSize: 24 Data Path Port: 4789 Orchestration: Task History Retention Limit: 5 Raft: Snapshot Interval: 10000 Number of Old Snapshots to Retain: 0 Heartbeat Tick: 1 Election Tick: 10 Dispatcher: Heartbeat Period: 5 seconds CA Configuration: Expiry Duration: 3 months Force Rotate: 0 Autolock Managers: false Root Rotation In Progress: false Node Address: 164.90.229.118 Manager Addresses: 138.68.65.250:2377 164.90.229.118:2377 164.90.229.127:2377 Runtimes: runc Default Runtime: runc Init Binary: docker-init containerd version: 7ad184331fa3e55e52b890ea95e65ba581ae3429 runc version: dc9208a3303feef5b3839f4323d9beb36df0a9dd init version: fec3683 Security Options: apparmor seccomp Profile: default Kernel Version: 4.15.0-112-generic Operating System: Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS OSType: linux Architecture: x86_64 CPUs: 1 Total Memory: 1.946GiB Name: nikolay-volkov-small-1 ID: YARQ:QDCY:35IG:SNZQ:MUNG:UZL2:WBUK:N7Q5:P4C6:6FTV:52NU:7DTF Docker Root Dir: /valib/docker Debug Mode: false Registry: https://index.docker.io/v1/ Labels: Experimental: false Insecure Registries: 127.0.0.0/8 Live Restore Enabled: false WARNING: No swap limit support 
Docker network ls:
NETWORK ID NAME DRIVER SCOPE 7266d22942a1 bridge bridge local edfbf6592868 docker_gwbridge bridge local 72f35302100b host host local hx6aj67pa4bz ingress overlay swarm 038d3f36bede none null local rhksb2n1j235 overflow_default overlay swarm 
Docker stack ps overflow
ID NAME IMAGE NODE DESIRED STATE CURRENT STATE ERROR PORTS cnk96s94dj8c overflow_traefik.1 traefik:v2.2 nikolay-volkov-small-2 Running Running 16 minutes ago wjziltuypmfj overflow_whoami.1 containous/whoami:latest nikolay-volkov-small-1 Running Running 28 minutes ago`enter code here` 
docker network inspect overflow_default:
[ { "Name": "overflow_default", "Id": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Created": "2020-08-15T14:21:20.194017073Z", "Scope": "swarm", "Driver": "overlay", "EnableIPv6": false, "IPAM": { "Driver": "default", "Options": null, "Config": [ { "Subnet": "10.0.2.0/24", "Gateway": "10.0.2.1" } ] }, "Internal": false, "Attachable": false, "Ingress": false, "ConfigFrom": { "Network": "" }, "ConfigOnly": false, "Containers": { "61afaac4fff8c2474d7166c4227c776860081630c04f7c3a3403ef29b716f94d": { "Name": "overflow_whoami.1.wjziltuypmfj7vg0zuxlj5kva", "EndpointID": "5ce2f8cfb37f2294210bbb538576d485c7c3cf066d836771da6a002e5fbbbafe", "MacAddress": "02:42:0a:00:02:03", "IPv4Address": "10.0.2.3/24", "IPv6Address": "" }, "lb-overflow_default": { "Name": "overflow_default-endpoint", "EndpointID": "d6453d2d9362bf95f3f34a06a8241e85410d3f8cf3ee0a6894baaecbe7348cea", "MacAddress": "02:42:0a:00:02:04", "IPv4Address": "10.0.2.4/24", "IPv6Address": "" } }, "Options": { "com.docker.network.driver.overlay.vxlanid_list": "4098" }, "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "Peers": [ { "Name": "995d8aecdcfe", "IP": "164.90.229.118" }, { "Name": "853c9483a7b7", "IP": "164.90.229.127" } ] } ] 
docker service inspect overflow_whoami:
[ { "ID": "tkbf0ucohva6eg76vzvfkhh6m", "Version": { "Index": 57011 }, "CreatedAt": "2020-08-15T14:21:20.020420896Z", "UpdatedAt": "2020-08-15T14:49:19.975265202Z", "Spec": { "Name": "overflow_whoami", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.image": "containous/whoami", "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "TaskTemplate": { "ContainerSpec": { "Image": "containous/whoami:[email protected]:7d6a3c8f91470a23ef380320609ee6e69ac68d20bc804f3a1c6065fb56cfa34e", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow", "traefik.enable": "true", "traefik.http.routers.whoami.entrypoints": "web", "traefik.http.routers.whoami.rule": "Host(`whoami.volkonik.xyz`)" }, "Privileges": { "CredentialSpec": null, "SELinuxContext": null }, "StopGracePeriod": 10000000000, "DNSConfig": {}, "Isolation": "default" }, "Resources": {}, "RestartPolicy": { "Condition": "any", "Delay": 5000000000, "MaxAttempts": 0 }, "Placement": { "Platforms": [ { "Architecture": "386", "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "amd64", "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "arm64", "OS": "linux" } ] }, "Networks": [ { "Target": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Aliases": [ "whoami" ] } ], "ForceUpdate": 0, "Runtime": "container" }, "Mode": { "Replicated": { "Replicas": 1 } }, "UpdateConfig": { "Parallelism": 1, "FailureAction": "pause", "Monitor": 5000000000, "MaxFailureRatio": 0, "Order": "stop-first" }, "RollbackConfig": { "Parallelism": 1, "FailureAction": "pause", "Monitor": 5000000000, "MaxFailureRatio": 0, "Order": "stop-first" }, "EndpointSpec": { "Mode": "vip" } }, "PreviousSpec": { "Name": "overflow_whoami", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.image": "containous/whoami", "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "TaskTemplate": { "ContainerSpec": { "Image": "containous/whoami:[email protected]:7d6a3c8f91470a23ef380320609ee6e69ac68d20bc804f3a1c6065fb56cfa34e", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow", "traefik.enable": "true", "traefik.http.routers.whoami.entrypoints": "web", "traefik.http.routers.whoami.rule": "Host(`whoami.volkonik.xyz`)" }, "Privileges": { "CredentialSpec": null, "SELinuxContext": null }, "Isolation": "default" }, "Resources": {}, "Placement": { "Platforms": [ { "Architecture": "386", "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "amd64", "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "arm64", "OS": "linux" } ] }, "Networks": [ { "Target": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Aliases": [ "whoami" ] } ], "ForceUpdate": 0, "Runtime": "container" }, "Mode": { "Replicated": { "Replicas": 1 } }, "EndpointSpec": { "Mode": "vip" } }, "Endpoint": { "Spec": { "Mode": "vip" }, "VirtualIPs": [ { "NetworkID": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Addr": "10.0.2.2/24" } ] } } ] 
docker service inspect overflow_traefik:
[ { "ID": "xzpl81oco98onhvqxxkhdnbxz", "Version": { "Index": 57010 }, "CreatedAt": "2020-08-15T14:21:21.644144642Z", "UpdatedAt": "2020-08-15T14:49:18.348979648Z", "Spec": { "Name": "overflow_traefik", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.image": "traefik:v2.2", "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "TaskTemplate": { "ContainerSpec": { "Image": "traefik:[email protected]:f5af5a5ce17fc3e353b507e8acce65d7f28126408a8c92dc3cac246d023dc9e8", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "Args": [ "--api.insecure=true", "--providers.docker=true", "--providers.docker.swarmMode=true", "--providers.docker.exposedbydefault=false", "--entrypoints.web.address=:80" ], "Privileges": { "CredentialSpec": null, "SELinuxContext": null }, "Mounts": [ { "Type": "bind", "Source": "/varun/docker.sock", "Target": "/varun/docker.sock", "ReadOnly": true } ], "StopGracePeriod": 10000000000, "DNSConfig": {}, "Isolation": "default" }, "Resources": {}, "RestartPolicy": { "Condition": "any", "Delay": 5000000000, "MaxAttempts": 0 }, "Placement": { "Platforms": [ { "Architecture": "amd64", "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "arm64", "OS": "linux" } ] }, "Networks": [ { "Target": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Aliases": [ "traefik" ] } ], "ForceUpdate": 0, "Runtime": "container" }, "Mode": { "Replicated": { "Replicas": 1 } }, "UpdateConfig": { "Parallelism": 1, "FailureAction": "pause", "Monitor": 5000000000, "MaxFailureRatio": 0, "Order": "stop-first" }, "RollbackConfig": { "Parallelism": 1, "FailureAction": "pause", "Monitor": 5000000000, "MaxFailureRatio": 0, "Order": "stop-first" }, "EndpointSpec": { "Mode": "vip", "Ports": [ { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 80, "PublishedPort": 80, "PublishMode": "ingress" }, { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 8080, "PublishedPort": 8080, "PublishMode": "ingress" } ] } }, "PreviousSpec": { "Name": "overflow_traefik", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.image": "traefik:v2.2", "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "TaskTemplate": { "ContainerSpec": { "Image": "traefik:[email protected]:f5af5a5ce17fc3e353b507e8acce65d7f28126408a8c92dc3cac246d023dc9e8", "Labels": { "com.docker.stack.namespace": "overflow" }, "Args": [ "--api.insecure=true", "--providers.docker=true", "--providers.docker.swarmMode=true", "--providers.docker.exposedbydefault=false", "--entrypoints.web.address=:80" ], "Privileges": { "CredentialSpec": null, "SELinuxContext": null }, "Mounts": [ { "Type": "bind", "Source": "/varun/docker.sock", "Target": "/varun/docker.sock", "ReadOnly": true } ], "Isolation": "default" }, "Resources": {}, "Placement": { "Platforms": [ { "Architecture": "amd64", "OS": "linux" }, { "OS": "linux" }, { "Architecture": "arm64", "OS": "linux" } ] }, "Networks": [ { "Target": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Aliases": [ "traefik" ] } ], "ForceUpdate": 0, "Runtime": "container" }, "Mode": { "Replicated": { "Replicas": 1 } }, "EndpointSpec": { "Mode": "vip", "Ports": [ { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 80, "PublishedPort": 80, "PublishMode": "ingress" }, { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 8080, "PublishedPort": 8080, "PublishMode": "ingress" } ] } }, "Endpoint": { "Spec": { "Mode": "vip", "Ports": [ { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 80, "PublishedPort": 80, "PublishMode": "ingress" }, { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 8080, "PublishedPort": 8080, "PublishMode": "ingress" } ] }, "Ports": [ { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 80, "PublishedPort": 80, "PublishMode": "ingress" }, { "Protocol": "tcp", "TargetPort": 8080, "PublishedPort": 8080, "PublishMode": "ingress" } ], "VirtualIPs": [ { "NetworkID": "hx6aj67pa4bz4nu70dyrdatq6", "Addr": "10.11.0.12/16" }, { "NetworkID": "rhksb2n1j235b3qkuvlgdrprp", "Addr": "10.0.2.5/24" } ] } } ] 
submitted by freesk8r to Traefik [link] [comments]

Any help with modding Windows 10 wifi adapter drivers to support free reign of MAC spoofing?

Basic summary of what I'm trying to accomplish here: I want to modify the drivers of my computer's network adapter to change its MAC address easily. Now, YES, I know that there are plenty of tools and advice to spoof MAC addresses for Windows. But the problem is since Windows Vista, all driver versions for wifi adapters will no longer support spoofed MAC addresses with the first octet being anything other than 02, 06, 0A, or 0E. This is almost certainly due to the wifi drivers. The solution in the past (Windows 7) was to simply download the outdated Windows XP drivers, which didn't have this restriction, and you'd be free to spoof as much as you wished. On Windows 10 the XP drivers no longer work. From what I've managed to find online, here's a quote from this website https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/59e07df3-471c-499e-ad5f-e7cb507595df/cannot-change-mac-address-in-windows-7-driver-has-option-doesnt-work-neither-does-regedit-ms?forum=w7itpronetworking from a user there called N.eee: MAC address: "XY-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX" "X" can be anything hexadecimal. The hexadecimal "Y", written in binary format, is Y: "kmnp", where "p" is the least significant bit; p=0 unicast; p=1 multicast;
n=0 globally assigned MAC; n=1 locally administered;
So, actually MAC can be changed not only to 12-XX-..., but to any combination in which p=0 and n=1; "Y" can be 2, 6, A or E.
I think it can be tweaked in registry, since it apply only to Wireless, not to Ethernet adapters. But I don't have much time to experiment.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:MAC_address Other forums and sites also said this. So from what I've been able to piece together with the miniscule knowledge I have, I'll need to mod this driver to use the same MAC structure Windows XP uses. Any help? If this is the wrong subreddit for this, please redirect me to the right one, I'm new here.
submitted by begin2code to hacking [link] [comments]

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222

MAME 0.222, the product of our May/June development cycle, is ready today, and it’s a very exciting release. There are lots of bug fixes, including some long-standing issues with classics like Bosconian and Gaplus, and missing pan/zoom effects in games on Seta hardware. Two more Nintendo LCD games are supported: the Panorama Screen version of Popeye, and the two-player Donkey Kong 3 Micro Vs. System. New versions of supported games include a review copy of DonPachi that allows the game to be paused for photography, and a version of the adult Qix game Gals Panic for the Taiwanese market.
Other advancements on the arcade side include audio circuitry emulation for 280-ZZZAP, and protection microcontroller emulation for Kick and Run and Captain Silver.
The GRiD Compass series were possibly the first rugged computers in the clamshell form factor, possibly best known for their use on NASA space shuttle missions in the 1980s. The initial model, the Compass 1101, is now usable in MAME. There are lots of improvements to the Tandy Color Computer drivers in this release, with better cartridge support being a theme. Acorn BBC series drivers now support Solidisk file system ROMs. Writing to IMD floppy images (popular for CP/M computers) is now supported, and a critical bug affecting writes to HFE disk images has been fixed. Software list additions include a collection of CDs for the SGI MIPS workstations.
There are several updates to Apple II emulation this month, including support for several accelerators, a new IWM floppy controller core, and support for using two memory cards simultaneously on the CFFA2. As usual, we’ve added the latest original software dumps and clean cracks to the software lists, including lots of educational titles.
Finally, the memory system has been optimised, yielding performance improvements in all emulated systems, you no longer need to avoid non-ASCII characters in paths when using the chdman tool, and jedutil supports more devices.
There were too many HyperScan RFID cards added to the software list to itemise them all here. You can read about all the updates in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAME Testers Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

Clones promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

submitted by cuavas to cade [link] [comments]

AssemblyScript Introduction (Part 1)

AssemblyScript Introduction (Part 1)
This article is written by the CoinEx Chain lab. CoinEx Chain is the world’s first public chain exclusively designed for DEX, and will also include a Smart Chain supporting smart contracts and a Privacy Chain protecting users’ privacy.
AssemblyScript is not a brand new programming language. Its syntax is a strict subset of the popular TypeScript language syntax. It is tailored and customized specifically for WebAssembly (hereinafter referred to as Wasm). The following diagram shows the grammatical relationship of JavaScript, TypeScript and AssemblyScript.

https://preview.redd.it/kpyvptf6r1551.png?width=1352&format=png&auto=webp&s=95759713118f3c21d83f86f25c6cda8846ba6a68
This article aims to discuss how AssemblyScript programs are compiled into Wasm modules. To understand the basic syntax and usage of AssemblyScript language, you can refer to the AssemblyScript tutorial. In our previous Wasm articles, we have discussed the Wasm binary format and instruction set in detail. We already know that the Wasm binary module organizes content by section, and there are currently 12 different types of sections. Let’s briefly review the content of these sections:
  • The custom section (ID is 0) stores auxiliary information such as function names. Such information does not affect the execution semantics of Wasm, and there won’t be any problem even if it is completely discarded.
  • The type section (ID is 1) stores function types (also called function signature) and block types.
  • The import section (ID is 2) stores the import information. There are four types of items that can be imported: functions, table, memory, and global variables.
  • The function section (ID is 3) stores the function signature information defined internally. This is an index table, which stores the index of the signature of the internally defined function in the type section.
  • Table section (ID is 4) stores internally defined table information. Restricted by the Wasm specification, the module can import or define only one table.
  • The memory section (ID is 5) stores internally defined memory information. Restricted by the Wasm specification, the module can import or define only one block of memory.
  • The global section (ID is 6) stores internally defined global variable information.
  • The export section (ID is 7) stores export information. Like the import section, there are four types of items that can be exported: functions, table, memory, and global variables.
  • The Start section (ID is 8) stores the start function index.
  • The element section (ID is 9) stores the initialization data of the table.
  • The code section (ID is 10) stores the local variable information and bytecode of the internally defined functions.
  • The data section (ID is 11) stores initialization data of the memory.
Let's take a look at how AssemblyScript programs are compiled into Wasm modules, or to be more specific, how the key information needed to run the program is stored in various sections. We will use the wasm2wat and wasm-objdump command line tools provided by WABT to observe the binary modules generated by the AssemblyScript compiler.

Type Section

All function signatures in the program will be collected by the compiler and put into the type section of the binary module. Here is an example:
declare function f1(x: i32): i32; declare function f2(x: f32, y: f32): f32; declare function f3(x: f32, y: f32): f32; export function f4(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return f1(b) + f1(b); } export function f5(a: f32, b: f32, c: f32): f32 { return f2(a, b) + f3(b, c); } 
In the above example three external functions are declared and two internal functions defined. Note that we need to mark the internal functions as exported (or turn off compiler optimization); otherwise they may be optimized out by the compiler. Compile the above program using AssemblyScript compiler, and then use the wasm-objdump command to convert the generated binary module to text format. The result is shown as below:
(module (type (;0;) (func (param f32 f32) (result f32))) (type (;1;) (func (param i32) (result i32))) (type (;2;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (type (;3;) (func (param f32 f32 f32) (result f32))) (import "index" "f1" (func (;0;) (type 1))) (import "index" "f2" (func (;1;) (type 0))) (import "index" "f3" (func (;2;) (type 0))) (func (;3;) (type 2) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;4;) (type 3) (; unrelated code ;) ) ;; unrelated code ) 
Since the signatures of f2() and f3() are the same, there are a total of four function signatures. As you can see, the compiler puts the signatures of f2() and f3() first, followed by the signatures of f1(), f4(), and f5().

Import & Export Section

As mentioned earlier, the module can import or export four kind of items: functions, table, memory, and global variables. According to the above example, if compiler optimization is not taken into consideration, the functions in AssemblyScript will be compiled into Wasm functions. Global variables also take on a similar correspondence, which we will see immediately. The following example shows how to declare external functions and global variables:
declare function add(a: i32, b: i32): i32; @external("sub2") declare function sub(a: i32, b: i32): i32; @external("math", "mul2") declare function mul(a: i32, b: i32): i32; @external("math", "pi") declare const pi: f32; export function main(): void { add(1, 2); sub(1, 2); mul(1, pi as i32); } 
The AssemblyScript compiler will take the file name of the compiled program as the external module name and the function or global variable name as the member name by default. Yet you can also use the @external annotation to explicitly specify the member name alone, or specify both the external module name and the member name. Table and memory are special, and we will discuss them in detail later. The AssemblyScript compiler provides --importTable and --importMemory options. If these two options are specified during compilation, table and memory import items (env.table and env.memory) will be generated in the import section of the module. Save the above example as index.ts and then compile it with these two options. Below is the compilation result (which has been converted to text format):
(module (type (;0;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (type (;1;) (func)) (import "index" "add" (func (;0;) (type 0))) (import "index" "sub2" (func (;1;) (type 0))) (import "math" "mul2" (func (;2;) (type 0))) (import "math" "pi" (global (;0;) f32)) (import "env" "memory" (memory (;0;) 0)) (import "env" "table" (table (;0;) 1 funcref)) (func (;3;) (type 1) (; unrelated code ;) ) ;; unrelated code ) 
The functions and global variables marked as exported in the AssemblyScript language will be put by the compiler in the export section of the module; the memory is exported by default, but can be turned off by the --noExportMemory option; the table is not exported by default, but can be turned on by the --exportTable option. Let's look at another example:
export const pi: f32 = 3.14; export function add(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a + b; } export function sub(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a - b; } export function mul(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a * b; } 
Compile the above example with the --exportTable option, and here is the compiled module (which has been converted to text format):
(module (type (;0;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (func (;0;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;1;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;2;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (table (;0;) 1 funcref) (memory (;0;) 0) (global (;0;) f32 (f32.const 0x1.91eb86p+1 (;=3.14;))) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "table" (table 0)) (export "pi" (global 0)) (export "add" (func 0)) (export "sub" (func 1)) (export "mul" (func 2)) (elem (;0;) (i32.const 1) func) ) 

Function & Code Section

As mentioned above, the function information defined in the module is divided into two sections: the signature information of the function is in the type section, and the local variable information and bytecode of the function are in the code section. If optimization is turned off completely, then there should be a direct correspondence between the functions defined in the AssemblyScript language and the functions in the Wasm module. That is to say, each function defined in the language will produce an entry in the function section and code section of the module. Let's look at an example:
function add(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a + b; } function sub(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a - b; } function mul(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a * b; } export function main(): void { add(1, 2); sub(1, 2); mul(1, 2); } 
When compiler optimization is turned on, such correspondence may be broken when it comes to non-exported internal functions. For better observation, we can specify the -O0 option to turn off optimization during compilation. The following is the compiled module (which has been converted to text format):
(module (type (;0;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (type (;1;) (func)) (func (;0;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;1;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;2;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;3;) (type 1) (; unrelated code ;) ) (table (;0;) 1 funcref) (memory (;0;) 0) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "main" (func 3)) (elem (;0;) (i32.const 1) func) ) 
It is more intuitive to observe the function section and code section with the wasm-objdumpcommand. The following is the output result (irrelevant content is omitted):
... Section Details: Type[2]: - type[0] (i32, i32) -> i32 - type[1] () -> nil Function[4]: - func[0] sig=0 - func[1] sig=0 - func[2] sig=0 - func[3] sig=1 
Table[1]: ... Memory[1]: ... Export[2]: ... Elem[1]: ... Code[4]: - func[0] size=7 - func[1] size=7 - func[2] size=7 - func[3] size=23
Custom: ...

Table & Element Section

The table in Wasm are mainly for implementing function pointers in C/C++ and other languages. Both AssemblyScript language and JavaScript/TypeScript language support first-class functions, which is also achieved through the Wasm table. Here is an example:
type op = (a: i32, b: i32) => i32; function add(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a + b; } function sub(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a - b; } function mul(a: i32, b: i32): i32 { return a * b; } export function calc(a: i32, b: i32, op: (x:i32, y:i32) => i32): i32 { return op(a, b); } export function main(a: i32, b: i32): void { calc(a, b, add); calc(a, b, sub); calc(a, b, mul); } 
The following is the compiled module (which has been converted to text format). Please pay attention to the table section and element section. We will talk more about Wasm table in subsequent articles.
(module (type (;0;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (type (;1;) (func (param i32 i32))) (type (;2;) (func (param i32 i32 i32) (result i32))) (func (;0;) (type 2) (param i32 i32 i32) (result i32) (call_indirect (type 0) (local.get 0) (local.get 1) (block (result i32) ;; label = @1 (global.set 0 (i32.const 2)) (local.get 2) ) ) ) (func (;1;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;2;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;3;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (func (;4;) (type 1) (param i32 i32) (drop (call 0 (local.get 0) (local.get 1) (i32.const 1))) (drop (call 0 (local.get 0) (local.get 1) (i32.const 2))) (drop (call 0 (local.get 0) (local.get 1) (i32.const 3))) ) (table (;0;) 4 funcref) (memory (;0;) 0) (global (;0;) (mut i32) (i32.const 0)) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "calc" (func 0)) (export "main" (func 4)) (elem (;0;) (i32.const 1) func 1 2 3) ) 

Memory & Data Section

We will discuss AssemblyScript memory management in detail subsequent articles. Let's first look at a simple example:
declare function printChar(c: i32): void; export function main(): void { const str = "Hello, World!\n"; for (let i = 0; i < str.length; i++) { printChar(str.charCodeAt(i)); } } 
UTF-16 encoding is adopted in AssemblyScript strings, and string literals are placed in the data section. The following is the compiled module (with compiler optimization on). Please pay attention to the memory section and data section:
(module (type (;0;) (func)) (type (;1;) (func (param i32))) (import "index" "printChar" (func (;0;) (type 1))) (func (;1;) (type 0) (; unrelated code ;) ) (memory (;0;) 1) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "main" (func 1)) (data (;0;) (i32.const 1024) "\1c\00\00\00\01\00\00\00\01\00\00\00\1c\00\00\00H\00e\00l\00l\00o\00,\00 \00W\00o\00r\00l\00d\00!\00\0a") ) 
The AssemblyScript compiler also provides two options, respectively --initialMemory and --maximumMemory, allowing us to explicitly control the initial and maximum number of pages of memory. We are not going into details here.

Global Section

As can be seen from the above, the AssemblyScript language uses Wasm global variables to implement global variables in the language. When the compiler optimization is turned off completely, each global variable defined in the AssemblyScript language will occupy an item in the global section of the generated module. Let's look at an example:
var g1: i32 = 100; export var g2: i32 = 200; export var g3: i64 = 300; export const pi: f32 = 3.14; export function main(): i32 { return g1; } 
The following is the compiled module (with compiler optimization off). As you can see, all the four global variables appear in the global section:
(module (type (;0;) (func (result i32))) (func (;0;) (type 0) (result i32) (global.get 0)) (table (;0;) 1 funcref) (memory (;0;) 0) (global (;0;) (mut i32) (i32.const 100)) (global (;1;) (mut i32) (i32.const 200)) (global (;2;) (mut i64) (i64.const 300)) (global (;3;) f32 (f32.const 0x1.91eb86p+1 (;=3.14;))) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "g2" (global 1)) (export "g3" (global 2)) (export "pi" (global 3)) (export "main" (func 0)) (elem (;0;) (i32.const 1) func) ) 

Start Section

The start section is to specify a start function index. The specified function will be automatically invoked after the module is instantiated, so as to perform some additional initialization. Here is an example:
declare function max(a: i32, b: i32): i32; declare function printI32(n: i32): void; var x = max(123, 456); export function main(): void { printI32(x); } 
In this example two external functions are declared and a global variable x and a function main() are defined. The AssemblyScript compiler needs to put the initialization logic of the global variable x into a function and the index of the function in the initial section. Please see the compiled module below (the index of the start function is 4):
(module (type (;0;) (func)) (type (;1;) (func (param i32))) (type (;2;) (func (param i32 i32) (result i32))) (import "index" "max" (func (;0;) (type 2))) (import "index" "printI32" (func (;1;) (type 1))) (func (;2;) (type 0) (global.set 0 (call 0 (i32.const 123) (i32.const 456))) ) (func (;3;) (type 0) (call 1 (global.get 0))) (func (;4;) (type 0) (call 2)) (table (;0;) 1 funcref) (memory (;0;) 0) (global (;0;) (mut i32) (i32.const 0)) (export "memory" (memory 0)) (export "main" (func 3)) (start 4) (elem (;0;) (i32.const 1) func) ) 

Custom Section

As mentioned above, the custom section mainly stores additional information, such as function names and other debugging information. The Wasm specification only defines one standard "name" custom section, which is specifically designed to store name information. By default, the AssemblyScript compiler does not generate a "name" custom section, but it can be enabled through the --debug option. Let's add the --debug option to recompile the above example, and observe the generated binary module through the wasm-objdump command (some irrelevant content is omitted):
... Section Details: Type[3]: - type[0] () -> nil - type[1] (i32) -> nil - type[2] (i32, i32) -> i32 Import[2]: - func[0] sig=2  <- index.max - func[1] sig=1  <- index.printI32 Function[3]: - func[2] sig=0  - func[3] sig=0  - func[4] sig=0 <~start> Table[1]: ... Memory[1]: ... Global[1]: - global[0] i32 mutable=1 - init i32=0 Export[2]: ... Start: - start function: 4 Elem[1]: ... Code[3]: - func[2] size=12  - func[3] size=6  - func[4] size=4 <~start> Custom: - name: "name" - func[0]  - func[1]  - func[2]  - func[3]  - func[4] <~start> Custom: - name: "sourceMappingURL" 

Summary

In this article, we have discussed how AssemblyScript programs are compiled into Wasm modules, focusing on what information is stored in the various sections of the Wasm module. Next time we will discuss how the AssemblyScript language uses the Wasm instruction set to implement various grammatical elements.
submitted by coinexchain to u/coinexchain [link] [comments]

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